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Hurricane Ian: Revived storm pounds South Carolina as death toll rises to 27

Flooding continued in central Florida as storm barrelled through state before gathering strength

Hurricane Ian moving up East Coast

A revived Hurricane Ian battered South Carolina, bringing heavy rains and flooded streets as the death toll in the US from one of its costliest storms climbed to 27.

The storm barrelled through western Cuba and raked across Florida before gathering strength in the warm waters of the Atlantic Ocean to curve back and strike South Carolina.

While the storm was downgraded to a post-tropical cyclone earlier on Friday, the agency warned river flooding will continue through next week across central Florida. Meanwhile, president Joe Biden has issued an emergency declaration for South Carolina.

The storm hit Florida as one of the most powerful hurricanes in the state’s history, with wind speeds nearly reaching Category 5.

Nearly 2 million people in Florida were left without power – and economic losses could amount to $120bn, according to an estimate.

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Hurricane Ian death toll rises

IndependentTV has the latest on tropical storm Ian as it continues to wreak havoc across Florida.

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Follow live: Traffic cam shows Tropical Storm Ian battering central Florida

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As millions remain without power, warnings over generators

The National Hurricane Center has issued a warning to those using generators as more than 2.6 million people in Florida remained without power.

“Many residents in Florida are starting recovery in the aftermath of #Ian & many will use Generators to provide power,” the agency tweeted on Thursday.

“We want to stress these Generator safety tips. Unfortunately, many indirect fatalities in hurricanes have occured after the fact due to improper generator use.”

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Live: Biden receives Hurricane Ian briefing at Fema

Watch as President Joe Biden receives an update on Hurricane Ian’s destructive path across Florida.

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BREAKING: Charleston is ‘shutting down’ ahead of Hurricane Ian

The mayor of Charleston, South Carolina, is asking his city to shut down on Friday as storm Ian approaches.

“There will be water tomorrow in this city,” Mayor John Tecklenburg said.

No evacuations have been ordered in South Carolina, with Ian forecast to make landfall a second time on Friday along the state’s coast as a minimal hurricane.

Forecasters warn several feet of ocean water could surge into low areas along the coast, like Charleston.

The flooding could rival or even slightly exceed recent hurricanes.

Associated Press

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Ian to bring ‘life-threatening’ flooding and storm surge to Georgia and Carolinas

The latest National Hurricane Center warning says that Ian is expected to bring “life-threatening flooding, storm surge and strong winds across portions of Florida, Georgia and the Carolinas.”

The NHC said at 2pm ET that Ian is 275 miles south of Charleston, South Carolina, traveling 9mph with current maximum sustained winds of 70mph.

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Major flooding at hotel at Universal Studios

Video of major flooding at a hotel at Universal Studios in Orlando, Florida, was posted by Spectrum News 13.

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Clean up starts in parts of western Florida

Workers clean debris in front of a house after Hurricane Ian passed through the area on September 29, 2022 in Bartow, Florida

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Scenes of destruction across Florida in wake of Ian

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Fort Myers pier destroyed by Ian

The scope of the damage caused by Hurricane Ian can be seen in a before and after picture of Fort Myers pier posted on social media by Sean Breslin of Weather.com.

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